Graphic Design Fundamentals for Jewellery Branding and Packaging


In spite of the age-old proverb “Never judge a book by its cover,” it is ingrained in human nature to make snap judgments about things based solely on appearances.

When it comes to operating a jewellery business, your brand is equivalent to your book cover; thus, it is important to adhere to our advice to ensure that it will attract clients.

In today’s increasingly digital world, branding is an essential component of every successful organisation, and this is especially true in the current context. There is a good reason why we have the idiom, “Never judge a book by its cover,” in our language.

 Because humans are inherently visual beings, we always form opinions about things based on how they seem, and branding is not an exception to this rule.

A consumer may enjoy your jewellery and be considering making a purchase, but if they have a negative impression of your brand, it is possible that they will also have a negative impression of the quality of your jewellery; as a result, they will reconsider making a purchase.

Your company’s identity may also be shaped through its branding, which can give it a distinct personality. When they see your company’s logo, what do you want your consumers to think about? Do you want others to think of you as someone who enjoys life to the fullest or someone who is grounded? Adventurous or luxurious?

Additionally, your jewellery designs should go hand in hand with your brand’s aesthetic. When potential buyers view your company’s emblem, they should immediately get an image in their head of what your jewellery would look like. Customers will be confused if you sell jewellery under a different brand than the one you use for your business.

This does not mean that you have to go out and hire a design firm that is known all over the globe to build your branding; rather, it indicates that if you want to create your own logo, website, and marketing materials, you will need to invest some time and effort into the process.

The Steps Taken Prior to the Actual Design

Before you can move on with developing your company’s logo and brand, you will first need to have a clear understanding of what your brand actually entails. There are occasions when the audience that you want to reach might not be a good fit for the brand that you presently have envisioned for yourself.

Identifying Characteristics of a Company

As we’ve mentioned in the past, you’ll want to make sure that your jewellery brand is consistent with the rest of your business and the items you sell. In the same way that you would create a business strategy, you will need to break down what your company does and who you are targeting with your marketing.

There are several essential inquiries that require your response, including the following:

Which of the following best describes your company’s mission statement and elevator pitch? To put it another way, what is your company’s name and what services does it provide? Do not respond by saying, “I am a jeweller and I want to sell jewellery,” as this is not an appropriate response. Take some time to think carefully about your company and the products or services you offer.

 The comment made by TIN HAUS serves as an excellent illustration of this: TIN HAUS is a modern fine jewellery brand that is owned and operated by a group of women from underrepresented communities and is located in Los Angeles.

We make bold-minimalistic statement items for both men and women, with an emphasis on uncompromising quality, research, and sustainability. These pieces are designed to be loved and will last a lifetime.

Tell me about the origin of your company’s name and whether it has a meaning or a narrative. If you want to name your jewellery business after yourself, the response to this question will carry less weight than if the firm were named after someone else; yet, answering it might still be helpful.

Is there something special about the way you’ve chosen to name your company or the items that you sell? It’s possible that you get all of your materials from nearby, or that you specialise in working with opals. In what ways could you be able to communicate such characteristics through your brand?

Who exactly constitutes the majority of your intended audience? And in the same way that you wouldn’t state “working ladies between the ages of 20 and 50” in a business plan, don’t say it in your advertisement either.

You won’t go far by continuing in that manner. Determine very specifically the kind of people you want to read your work. If you already know who you want to reach with your branding, you can use that information to design a strategy for reaching out to them in the most effective way possible.

Which of your organization’s core principles do you want to be associated with your brand? Is the jewellery you sell primarily for high-end occasions, or is it more for casual wear? Are you the adventurous kind, or do you like to keep things simple?

When someone sees your brand or emblem, what do you want them to think and how do you want them to feel? Do you want your consumers to feel thrilled about your products? Or perhaps at peace with themselves? When people view your jewellery, would they experience the same emotions that you do?

Now, keep in mind that the responses to each of these questions do not necessarily need to be communicated through your branding. These are supposed to serve as a guide for you as you work to determine exactly what it is that you want your brand to communicate.

Branding Visuals

Once you have determined what it is that you want your brand to convey to consumers, the next step is to determine how best to communicate that message.

 Consider a commercial enterprise that is looking to establish a cool and laid-back persona for itself; what hues would you use to communicate that sense of edginess and playfulness? What would you recommend for a jeweller that aimed to make their products appear more opulent to male customers? In that area, what colours would you want to use?

Take some time to give some thought to the following questions. These decisions do not need to be finalised just yet, but they will assist you in laying the framework for the rest of the process.

  • Which hues would you like people to associate with your product or service?
  • Which colours would you like NOT to have?
  • When they see your brand, what qualities and/or sensations do you want consumers to associate with it? What are some things that you would prefer not to have?
  • What are some adjectives that come to mind when you think about your product? What are some terms that you would prefer not to use?

Use the chart that is provided below to gain a clearer picture of the qualities that you want to be associated with your brand. This may be especially helpful if you are still having trouble deciding on the visuals that will be used for your branding. You are welcome to print it if you’d like!

Put simply, putting everything together

Now let’s pretend that I’m going into business for myself under the name Rebel Cat Designs, which is completely made up. You are welcome to follow along as I develop a logo and brand for this firm as we proceed through the following several sections of this article.

You will get the opportunity to witness how a brand may be brought to life, as well as what approaches are successful and which ones are not.

Before we go on to the next step, it is important that we have a clear understanding of what the firm Rebel Cat Designs actually is. Let’s start by responding to the questions that were asked earlier:

Identity

  1. What is the sentence that best represents the mission of your company?

I want to design jewellery that has a high-end look but yet has a fun element to it.

2.Tell me about the origin of your company’s name and whether it has a meaning or a narrative.

The name is a good fit for the demographic I’m trying to appeal to because I have a cat that is both incredibly intelligent and very independent.

3.Is there something special about the way you’ve chosen to name your company or the items that you sell?

Due to the fact that it is modelled after one of my cats named Neytiri, the logo might be designed to reflect her appearance.

4.Who exactly constitutes the majority of your intended audience?

Young women in the workforce who have a need for jewellery that looks sophisticated and has a distinctive twist, but who are unwilling to spend more than one hundred dollars on a single piece of jewellery.

5.Which of your organization’s core principles do you want to be associated with your brand?

A balance of sophistication and lightheartedness

6.When someone sees your brand or emblem, what do you want them to think and how do you want them to feel?

Store of fine jewellery that is both friendly and entertaining

Visuals

Which hues would you like people to associate with your product or service? Black, white, with an unexpected splash of colour

  • Which colours would you like NOT to have? Brown, Yellow, Pink, and Green are the colours in this rainbow.
  • When they see your brand, what qualities and/or sensations do you want consumers to associate with it? High end, enjoyable, inexpensive
  • What are some things that you would prefer NOT to have? snobbish, pricey, and reserved only for the wealthy
  • What are some adjectives that come to mind when you think about your product? Modern and fun
  • What are some terms that you would prefer NOT to use? Vintage, drab, uniform

In addition to this, we finished the chart of brand characteristics for Rebel Cat Designs, which includes the following.


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